Internet, Web, and Other Post-Watergate Concerns

Q. What is the plural of e-mail when it’s used as a noun? Is it e-mail or e-mails? There’s been a bit of controversy over this as a lot of people say “e-mails” but the plural form of mail, when used as a noun, is mail. Then, there’s e-mailings. Thanks!

Q. Is there a proper format for creating an e-mail?

Q. Which is currently accepted: Web site, web site, website, or Website?

Q. I edit documents used in the healthcare informatics domain, where e-health, eHealth, e-community, e-practice, and other ever-growing variations on the “e-” are present. If the “e-” or the “e” plus a word begins a sentence, I am capitalizing that darn “e.” Otherwise, it looks very strange. Am I correct?

Q. I get so tired of reading about writers using their “spell-checkers” on their computers. Surely they mean “spelling-checkers” don’t they? I’ve always thought that only wizards use “spell-checkers”—what do you think? I love CMOS—read it all the time—I start browsing and I can’t stop! Thanks again for a great resource!

Q. I could not find the term “dot-com” addressed, and I need to know how to capitalize it and punctuate it. I have seen both dot.com, and dot-com. Which is correct? In capitalizing titles, is it Dot.com or Dot.Com (in title headings, etc.)?

Q. Is there a proper way to mention the names of computer games in text? Italics? Quotes?

Q. I work for a Québec government department and we are trying to make our English websites consistent. Capitalization is a real problem. We had thought we should treat choices on menus like side heads and capitalize only the first word, but browsing through the Net, we find a lot of sites that capitalize all the important words in the menu choices in their sidebars. Do you have any advice on this point? The University of Chicago Press does NOT capitalize its menu (http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ ). Is that my answer?

Q. We’re trying to find a definitive style for representing file names, commands, and computer buttons (e.g., click “exit”) in text. For file names, for example, I’ve found quotation marks, italics, all caps, boldface . . . you name it, including no differentiation at all. How would you suggest treating a file name in a sentence such as “Open the readme.rtf file before continuing with the installation”? What about commands in a sentence such as “Click on File and select Open”?

Q. Here’s an Internet term I can’t find in Merriam-Webster: “popup” (or pop up, or pop-up), as in those annoying ads you get on many web pages. Is it one word, hyphenated, or with a space? (“Pop-up” is in MW, but as a baseball term for “pop fly,” ca. 1906—hardly up-to-date for the web!)