CMOS FAQ Questions http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/ Latest CMOS FAQ Questions with links to the answers en-us Wed, 19 Jun 2019 05:00:00 GMT 60 https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Capitalization/faq0080.html Q. Permission forms sometimes use ALL CAPS for authors, titles, or copyright holders—for example, “All Rights Controlled and Administered by [MUSIC PUBLISHER].” Must a credit line copy that style? Changing to italic title capitalization seems acceptable where all caps were used in place of italics in a title, but what about names? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> Permission forms sometimes use ALL CAPS for authors, titles, or copyright holders&mdash;for example, &ldquo;All Rights Controlled and Administered by [MUSIC PUBLISHER].&rdquo; Must a credit line copy that style? Changing to italic title capitalization seems acceptable where all caps were used in place of italics in a title, but what about names?</p> Mon, 03 Jun 2019 16:02:21 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Usage/faq0361.html Q. Hi. My question has to do with whether a new entry in the 17th edition was accidental or deliberate. Paragraph 8.185 includes this sentence: “&nbsp;‘Aladdin’ is arguably the most well-known tale in A Thousand and One Nights.” I’m curious to know if this sentence simply slipped through or if Chicago defends the use of “most well-known”? I ask because Philip Corbett, standards editor for the New York Times, ran a blog called After Deadline as a teaching tool to point out grammatical and stylistic missteps that made it to print. He often called out writers for using “most well-known” in place of “best-known”: “The superlative form of the adverb ‘well’ is ‘best.’ So there’s no reason to describe something as ‘the most well-known’—make it ‘the best-known’&nbsp;” (After Deadline, August 4, 2008). <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> Hi. My question has to do with whether a new entry in the 17th edition was accidental or deliberate. <a href="https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/book/ed17/part2/ch08/psec185.html" target="_blank">Paragraph 8.185</a> includes this sentence: &ldquo;&nbsp;&lsquo;Aladdin&rsquo; is arguably the most well-known tale in <em>A Thousand and One Nights</em>.&rdquo; I&rsquo;m curious to know if this sentence simply slipped through or if Chicago defends the use of &ldquo;most well-known&rdquo;? I ask because Philip Corbett, standards editor for the <em>New York Times</em>, ran a blog called <em>After Deadline</em> as a teaching tool to point out grammatical and stylistic missteps that made it to print. He often called out writers for using &ldquo;most well-known&rdquo; in place of &ldquo;best-known&rdquo;: &ldquo;The superlative form of the adverb &lsquo;well&rsquo; is &lsquo;best.&rsquo; So there&rsquo;s no reason to describe something as &lsquo;the most well-known&rsquo;&mdash;make it &lsquo;the best-known&rsquo;&nbsp;&rdquo; (<a href="https://afterdeadline.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/08/04/the-error-that-wont-die/" target="_blank"><em>After Deadline</em>, August 4, 2008</a>).</p> Mon, 03 Jun 2019 15:58:08 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Alphabetizing/faq0031.html Q. I can’t locate an answer to this question. Are proper names with particles alphabetized based on the particle or the first element? I.e., which comes first, “da Rosa” or “Dario”? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> I can&rsquo;t locate an answer to this question. Are proper names with particles alphabetized based on the particle or the first element? I.e., which comes first, &ldquo;da Rosa&rdquo; or &ldquo;Dario&rdquo;?</p> Mon, 03 Jun 2019 15:56:43 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0143.html Q. I know that the CMOS preference is not to hyphenate “noun + gerund” compounds, but in the case of “decision-making,” which appears with the hyphen in many dictionaries, would CMOS call for a hyphen? Thank you in advance! <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> I know that the <em>CMOS</em> preference is not to hyphenate &ldquo;noun + gerund&rdquo; compounds, but in the case of &ldquo;decision-making,&rdquo; which appears with the hyphen in many dictionaries, would <em>CMOS</em> call for a hyphen? Thank you in advance!</p> Mon, 03 Jun 2019 15:53:37 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/CMOS/faq0015.html Q. I know that Chicago recommends the dictionaries published by Merriam-Webster, but as a writer based in Canada is it possible to opt for a dictionary of Canadian English and still be in conformity with Chicago? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> I know that Chicago recommends the dictionaries published by Merriam-Webster, but as a writer based in Canada is it possible to opt for a dictionary of Canadian English and still be in conformity with Chicago?</p> Mon, 03 Jun 2019 15:50:51 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/CapitalizationTitles/faq0087.html Q. I’m editing a biography (in English) of a French historical figure that contains many French-language titles of works, including plays, books, poems, and artwork. I’m applying Chicago’s rule of sentence-case capitalization to these titles (for example, La dame aux cam&eacute;lias). But what about a title like Les Mis&eacute;rables? Should that actually be written Les mis&eacute;rables? That doesn’t seem right. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> I&rsquo;m editing a biography (in English) of a French historical figure that contains many French-language titles of works, including plays, books, poems, and artwork. I&rsquo;m applying Chicago&rsquo;s rule of sentence-case capitalization to these titles (for example, <em>La dame aux cam&eacute;lias</em>). But what about a title like <em>Les Mis&eacute;rables</em>? Should that actually be written <em>Les mis&eacute;rables</em>? That doesn&rsquo;t seem right.</p> Mon, 03 Jun 2019 15:45:14 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Quotations/faq0071.html Q. In dialogue, do you spell out social titles? For example, “Mister Lewis, please come to the table.” If so, what should we do with “Ms.”? This is a different word from “Miss,” so that isn’t a totally accurate spelling. Obviously “Ms.” (pronounced “miz”) implies that marital status is unknown, while “Miss” suggests being single. Should the dialogue just be “Ms. Smith” throughout, or “Miss Smith” even though the author means “Ms.”? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> In dialogue, do you spell out social titles? For example, &ldquo;Mister Lewis, please come to the table.&rdquo; If so, what should we do with &ldquo;Ms.&rdquo;? This is a different word from &ldquo;Miss,&rdquo; so that isn&rsquo;t a totally accurate spelling. Obviously &ldquo;Ms.&rdquo; (pronounced &ldquo;miz&rdquo;) implies that marital status is unknown, while &ldquo;Miss&rdquo; suggests being single. Should the dialogue just be &ldquo;Ms. Smith&rdquo; throughout, or &ldquo;Miss Smith&rdquo; even though the author means &ldquo;Ms.&rdquo;?</p> Mon, 03 Jun 2019 15:42:25 GMT