CMOS FAQ Questions http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/ Latest CMOS FAQ Questions with links to the answers en-us Thu, 05 Dec 2019 06:00:00 GMT 60 https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Capitalization/faq0085.html Q. Greetings, wise ones. I work with a university press; the university itself insists on capitalizing the first “The” in its name, even in running text and with the abbreviated form. I have refused to do this in our books because it flies in the face of house style and looks ridiculous in the context of other university names (“We conducted our research at the University of X, The University of Y [The UY], and the University of Z”). Needless to say, the university itself did not consult its press when developing its style guide. Those authors who are staff members keep “correcting” the lowercase t. Do I have a leg to stand on here? Or do I have to update our style sheet to indicate this exception? (Surely only The Hague gets to keep the capital T?) Grateful for at least sympathy if not vindication. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> Greetings, wise ones. I work with a university press; the university itself insists on capitalizing the first &ldquo;The&rdquo; in its name, even in running text and with the abbreviated form. I have refused to do this in our books because it flies in the face of house style and looks ridiculous in the context of other university names (&ldquo;We conducted our research at the University of X, The University of Y [The UY], and the University of Z&rdquo;). Needless to say, the university itself did not consult its press when developing its style guide. Those authors who are staff members keep &ldquo;correcting&rdquo; the lowercase <em>t</em>. Do I have a leg to stand on here? Or do I have to update our style sheet to indicate this exception? (Surely only The Hague gets to keep the capital <em>T</em>?) Grateful for at least sympathy if not vindication.</p> Sun, 01 Dec 2019 15:46:35 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0149.html Q. I have an ongoing disagreement with another scholar that I’m hoping you can help resolve. He suggests that the phrase “early modern” requires hyphenation when used as an adjective (ex.: “early-modern literature”). I would instead say “early modern literature”; is there a right answer here? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> I have an ongoing disagreement with another scholar that I&rsquo;m hoping you can help resolve. He suggests that the phrase &ldquo;early modern&rdquo; requires hyphenation when used as an adjective (ex.: &ldquo;early-modern literature&rdquo;). I would instead say &ldquo;early modern literature&rdquo;; is there a right answer here?</p> Sun, 01 Dec 2019 15:43:55 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ProperNames/faq0057.html Q. Hello, this question is in regard to paragraph 8.54 of the Manual. One of the examples of a generic term for a geographic entity is “the Hudson River valley.” I was wondering why “valley” is not capitalized, despite being part of the proper name. I am most likely just missing a really big point here, but it feels like the equivalent of saying “the Grand canyon.” Thank you so much for your help and your time! <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> Hello, this question is in regard to paragraph 8.54 of the <em>Manual</em>. One of the examples of a generic term for a geographic entity is &ldquo;the Hudson River valley.&rdquo; I was wondering why &ldquo;valley&rdquo; is not capitalized, despite being part of the proper name. I am most likely just missing a really big point here, but it feels like the equivalent of saying &ldquo;the Grand canyon.&rdquo; Thank you so much for your help and your time!</p> Sun, 01 Dec 2019 15:39:55 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0364.html Q. When citing a book in a bibliography, endnotes, etc., one does not include the name of the library that holds the volume consulted. Why, then, must we continue to include the URL of books we’ve consulted online that have been scanned by Google Books, HathiTrust, or the Internet Archive, to name a few such providers? Isn’t the internet as common a place a researcher would go to find a book these days as is a library or bookstore? Why is it necessary any longer to give internet sources “credit” for “possessing” a copy of a book when physical holders have always gone “uncredited”? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> When citing a book in a bibliography, endnotes, etc., one does not include the name of the library that holds the volume consulted. Why, then, must we continue to include the URL of books we&rsquo;ve consulted online that have been scanned by Google Books, HathiTrust, or the Internet Archive, to name a few such providers? Isn&rsquo;t the internet as common a place a researcher would go to find a book these days as is a library or bookstore? Why is it necessary any longer to give internet sources &ldquo;credit&rdquo; for &ldquo;possessing&rdquo; a copy of a book when physical holders have always gone &ldquo;uncredited&rdquo;?</p> Sun, 01 Dec 2019 15:35:40 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0363.html Q. Hi there. I’m wondering if you can resolve what seems to me to be a contradiction in the Manual. I’ve got short-form notes and a bibliography that include names with lowercased particles (e.g., du). CMOS 8.5 says the particle is “always capitalized when beginning a sentence or a note.” But CMOS 14.21 says, “A bibliography entry starts with a capital letter unless the first word would normally be lowercased (as in a last name that begins with a lowercase particle; see 8.5).” Sorry if I’m missing something, but aren’t these two sections contradicting each other? Or are short-form notes and bibliography entries really supposed to treat such names differently? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> Hi there. I&rsquo;m wondering if you can resolve what seems to me to be a contradiction in the <em>Manual</em>. I&rsquo;ve got short-form notes and a bibliography that include names with lowercased particles (e.g., du). <a href="https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/book/ed17/part2/ch08/psec005.html" target="_blank"><em>CMOS</em> 8.5</a> says the particle is &ldquo;always capitalized when beginning a sentence or a note.&rdquo; But <a href="https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/book/ed17/part3/ch14/psec021.html" target="_blank"><em>CMOS</em> 14.21</a> says, &ldquo;A bibliography entry starts with a capital letter unless the first word would normally be lowercased (as in a last name that begins with a lowercase particle; see 8.5).&rdquo; Sorry if I&rsquo;m missing something, but aren&rsquo;t these two sections contradicting each other? Or are short-form notes and bibliography entries really supposed to treat such names differently?</p> Sun, 01 Dec 2019 15:31:02 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Pronouns/faq0030.html Q. I’ve been told not to refer to the object of a preposition with a pronoun, as in “In the article by Frank Bruni, he claims .&nbsp;.&nbsp;.” Should this instead be “In the article by Frank Bruni, Bruni claims .&nbsp;.&nbsp;.”? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> I&rsquo;ve been told not to refer to the object of a preposition with a pronoun, as in &ldquo;In the article by Frank Bruni, he claims .&nbsp;.&nbsp;.&rdquo; Should this instead be &ldquo;In the article by Frank Bruni, Bruni claims .&nbsp;.&nbsp;.&rdquo;?</p> Sun, 01 Dec 2019 15:28:50 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Usage/faq0363.html Q. Hello. Is it appropriate to use ’s for “is”? For example: John’s running every day. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> Hello. Is it appropriate to use <em>&rsquo;s</em> for &ldquo;is&rdquo;? For example: John&rsquo;s running every day.</p> Sun, 01 Dec 2019 15:27:06 GMT