CMOS FAQ Questions http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/ Latest CMOS FAQ Questions with links to the answers en-us Tue, 31 Mar 2020 05:00:00 GMT 60 https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Usage/faq0367.html Q. In running text, should “at” be included before an Instagram or Twitter handle? For example, “To learn more, tweet her @username” or “To learn more, tweet her at @username”? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> In running text, should &ldquo;at&rdquo; be included before an Instagram or Twitter handle? For example, &ldquo;To learn more, tweet her @username&rdquo; or &ldquo;To learn more, tweet her at @username&rdquo;?</p> Sun, 01 Mar 2020 14:23:09 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Capitalization/faq0086.html Q. I am convinced “the prophet Isaiah” in CMOS 8.93 is a typo. So my question is: Really? Is “prophet” really down in “the prophet Isaiah”? Or “apostle” in “the apostle Paul”? Thank you for your time. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> I am convinced &ldquo;the prophet Isaiah&rdquo; in <a href="https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/book/ed17/part2/ch08/psec093.html" target="_blank"><em>CMOS</em> 8.93</a> is a typo. So my question is: Really? Is &ldquo;prophet&rdquo; really down in &ldquo;the prophet Isaiah&rdquo;? Or &ldquo;apostle&rdquo; in &ldquo;the apostle Paul&rdquo;? Thank you for your time.</p> Sun, 01 Mar 2020 14:21:03 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Pronouns/faq0032.html Q. Good day, fellow editors! The conventional rule about companies is to refer to them in the singular: “The company released its quarterly earnings statement.” Fine. But consider this: “The company’s recommendations are X, Y, and Z. I suggest you follow up by asking it these questions.” Or: “Company C shows it cares about its customers. We worked with it to demonstrate its commitment.” Those sentences just sound wrong. Surely you would follow up by asking them questions and work with them to demonstrate their commitment. So what to do? Refer to companies as “they” consistently? (Noneditors have a natural tendency to do this anyway.) Use “it” and switch to “they” where it makes sense to, but then end up with inconsistent pronouns? Your insight is appreciated! <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> Good day, fellow editors! The conventional rule about companies is to refer to them in the singular: &ldquo;The company released its quarterly earnings statement.&rdquo; Fine. But consider this: &ldquo;The company&rsquo;s recommendations are X, Y, and Z. I suggest you follow up by asking it these questions.&rdquo; Or: &ldquo;Company C shows it cares about its customers. We worked with it to demonstrate its commitment.&rdquo; Those sentences just sound wrong. Surely you would follow up by asking <em>them</em> questions and work with <em>them</em> to demonstrate <em>their</em> commitment. So what to do? Refer to companies as &ldquo;they&rdquo; consistently? (Noneditors have a natural tendency to do this anyway.) Use &ldquo;it&rdquo; and switch to &ldquo;they&rdquo; where it makes sense to, but then end up with inconsistent pronouns? Your insight is appreciated!</p> Sun, 01 Mar 2020 14:19:36 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Abbreviations/faq0089.html Q. Once and for all: to abbreviate “postscript” at the end of correspondence, is it best to write PS or P.S.? The glossary in CMOS advises no periods, but several examples in the Q&A use them, like this one. Help! <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> Once and for all: to abbreviate &ldquo;postscript&rdquo; at the end of correspondence, is it best to write PS or P.S.? <a href="https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/book/ed17/backmatter/glos.html#glos-glo01-169" target="_blank">The glossary in <em>CMOS</em> advises no periods</a>, but several examples in the Q&amp;A use them, <a href="https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Punctuation/faq0049.html" target="_blank">like this one</a>. Help!</p> Sun, 01 Mar 2020 14:15:23 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0366.html Q. I write scientific review articles for a company. When I use Zoterobib to cite sources in my articles, I see that scientific names for organisms in the titles that I add to my bibliography are not italicized, even though I chose “Chicago Manual of Style 17th edition” as the style. Should I italicize the scientific names in my article’s bibliography, or is Zoterobib correct? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> I write scientific review articles for a company. When I use Zoterobib to cite sources in my articles, I see that scientific names for organisms in the titles that I add to my bibliography are not italicized, even though I chose &ldquo;Chicago Manual of Style 17th edition&rdquo; as the style. Should I italicize the scientific names in my article&rsquo;s bibliography, or is Zoterobib correct?</p> Sun, 01 Mar 2020 13:55:10 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0151.html Q. Lately I see more and more hyphenated -ly phrases, especially in digital communication—e.g., “a hastily-made decision.” Is this just my cognitive bias inventing a trend that isn’t there, or have your editors noticed more -ly hyphens as well? I know they’re more unnecessary than incorrect, so am I being fussy to mark them for deletion if they’re used consistently and doing no real harm to reader comprehension? Thanks as always for your insight. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> Lately I see more and more hyphenated <em>-ly</em> phrases, especially in digital communication&mdash;e.g., &ldquo;a hastily-made decision.&rdquo; Is this just my cognitive bias inventing a trend that isn&rsquo;t there, or have your editors noticed more <em>-ly</em> hyphens as well? I know they&rsquo;re more unnecessary than incorrect, so am I being fussy to mark them for deletion if they&rsquo;re used consistently and doing no real harm to reader comprehension? Thanks as always for your insight.</p> Sun, 01 Mar 2020 13:53:24 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Commas/faq0092.html Q. Regarding the placement of a comma after “of course,” I’d always treated “of course” used emphatically differently from “of course” used as an aside. With the emergence of better grammar checkers being utilized with an assumption of accuracy, I now see more of this: “Can I come over?” “Of course, you can.” Is this actually correct? I’ve been unsuccessful in finding a conclusive answer. Some sources say you always put a comma after “of course.” Others say it’s up to the author. Since it seems that the placement of a comma can change the meaning, I’d hoped for something a bit more definitive than “You do you, boo.” <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.</span> Regarding the placement of a comma after &ldquo;of course,&rdquo; I&rsquo;d always treated &ldquo;of course&rdquo; used emphatically differently from &ldquo;of course&rdquo; used as an aside. With the emergence of better grammar checkers being utilized with an assumption of accuracy, I now see more of this: &ldquo;Can I come over?&rdquo; &ldquo;Of course, you can.&rdquo; Is this actually correct? I&rsquo;ve been unsuccessful in finding a conclusive answer. Some sources say you always put a comma after &ldquo;of course.&rdquo; Others say it&rsquo;s up to the author. Since it seems that the placement of a comma can change the meaning, I&rsquo;d hoped for something a bit more definitive than &ldquo;You do you, boo.&rdquo;</p> Sun, 01 Mar 2020 13:51:51 GMT