CMOS FAQ Questions http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/ Latest CMOS FAQ Questions with links to the answers en-us Sun, 19 Aug 2018 05:00:00 GMT 60 https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0346.html Q. I’ve noticed that print and e-book versions of the same title sometimes have different dates of publication; how should this be dealt with in bibliographic entries? If I were quoting from such a work, I would provide the publication date of whichever version, print or digital, I had consulted, but what about a reference that’s intended only to point the reader toward a certain resource (“for more on this topic, see Smith 2018”)? In that case, should preference be given to the earlier date over the later? To the print version over the digital? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I&rsquo;ve noticed that print and e-book versions of the same title sometimes have different dates of publication; how should this be dealt with in bibliographic entries? If I were quoting from such a work, I would provide the publication date of whichever version, print or digital, I had consulted, but what about a reference that&rsquo;s intended only to point the reader toward a certain resource (&ldquo;for more on this topic, see Smith 2018&rdquo;)? In that case, should preference be given to the earlier date over the later? To the print version over the digital?</p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 20:17:06 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/YouCouldLookItUp/faq0028.html Q. I wanted to ask if the word golly is used in the Chicago style guide. Thank you. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I wanted to ask if the word <em>golly</em> is used in the Chicago style guide. Thank you.</p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 20:15:39 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0345.html Q. I am working on a research paper for an upper-level anthropology class and could not find the correct method for citing a quote that contains several in-text citations. How do I address the in-text citations? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I am working on a research paper for an upper-level anthropology class and could not find the correct method for citing a quote that contains several in-text citations. How do I address the in-text citations?</p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 20:14:24 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/SecondThoughts/faq0003.html Q. Hi, CMOS staff. My question itself concerns two Q&A entries. In the first one, it looks as though a department name, even when part of a long corporate title, gets capped: “Mary Smith, director of Human Resources.” In the second one, though, it appears that if an otherwise would-be-capped department is a part of the title, it too gets lowercased: “Jordan Smith is assistant secretary of bureaucracy and obfuscation.” I’m editing a book that is constantly shifting its capitalization patterns for these departments (such as “chair of the Department of Physiology and Neuroscience” and “the head of the emergency department”), and I’m having a hard time determining which way to jump, because the advice in these Q&A entries seems to be contradictory. Could anyone shed some light on this for me? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Hi, <em>CMOS</em> staff. My question itself concerns two Q&amp;A entries. In the <a href="http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/CapitalizationTitles/faq0045.html" target="_blank">first one</a>, it looks as though a department name, even when part of a long corporate title, gets capped: &ldquo;Mary Smith, director of Human Resources.&rdquo; In the <a href="http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/CapitalizationTitles/faq0053.html" target="_blank">second one</a>, though, it appears that if an otherwise would-be-capped department is a part of the title, it too gets lowercased: &ldquo;Jordan Smith is assistant secretary of bureaucracy and obfuscation.&rdquo; I&rsquo;m editing a book that is constantly shifting its capitalization patterns for these departments (such as &ldquo;chair of the Department of Physiology and Neuroscience&rdquo; and &ldquo;the head of the emergency department&rdquo;), and I&rsquo;m having a hard time determining which way to jump, because the advice in these Q&amp;A entries seems to be contradictory. Could anyone shed some light on this for me?</p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 20:12:31 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Usage/faq0348.html Q. I am a copyeditor for a tiny scientific journal. I was given the following sentence: It is intriguing to note that BE has 18- to 33-fold the analgesic potency of morphine. I felt that this was incorrect and should have been changed to “18 to 33 times the analgesic potency” or “an 18- to 33-fold greater analgesic potency.” My editor overruled me by telling me that in scientific writing this is acceptable. I believe he is being confused by the fact that dictionaries give times as the definition of -fold (the true meaning of -fold is quite debatable, but that is not my question). I can’t seem to find a good reference for correct usage in this case.&nbsp; <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I am a copyeditor for a tiny scientific journal. I was given the following sentence: It is intriguing to note that BE has 18- to 33-fold the analgesic potency of morphine. I felt that this was incorrect and should have been changed to &ldquo;18 to 33 times the analgesic potency&rdquo; or &ldquo;an 18- to 33-fold greater analgesic potency.&rdquo; My editor overruled me by telling me that in scientific writing this is acceptable. I believe he is being confused by the fact that dictionaries give <em>times</em> as the definition of <em>-fold</em> (the true meaning of <em>-fold</em> is quite debatable, but that is not my question). I can&rsquo;t seem to find a good reference for correct usage in this case.&nbsp;</p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 20:07:51 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0135.html Q. I’ve been having a discussion about the use of the term “water-resistant.” Chicago style dictates the use of a hyphen in such a compound only when it precedes a noun. However, the term is recognized by the Merriam-Webster dictionary. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I&rsquo;ve been having a discussion about the use of the term &ldquo;water-resistant.&rdquo; Chicago style dictates the use of a hyphen in such a compound only when it precedes a noun. However, the term is recognized by the Merriam-Webster dictionary.</p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 20:05:52 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/YouCouldLookItUp/faq0029.html Q. I am editing a short-story anthology. One of the submissions contains this phrase: “barb wire fence.” My instinct tells me that a hyphen is needed between the first two words, yet I cannot locate an example from a reliable source. What do you recommend, please? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I am editing a short-story anthology. One of the submissions contains this phrase: &ldquo;barb wire fence.&rdquo; My instinct tells me that a hyphen is needed between the first two words, yet I cannot locate an example from a reliable source. What do you recommend, please?</p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 20:04:09 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0133.html Q. Dear CMOS, I’m having a disagreement with an editor about hyphenation in one of my soon-to-be-published short stories. I hate the idea of one of my stories seeing print with a grammatical error. I’m in desperate need of an official CMOS ruling, just to make sure we get this right! The section in question is as follows: “Most people only know the one reality they’ve lived. You’re getting front-row seats to three more.” Should “front-row seats” be hyphenated in this instance? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Dear <em>CMOS</em>, I&rsquo;m having a disagreement with an editor about hyphenation in one of my soon-to-be-published short stories. I hate the idea of one of my stories seeing print with a grammatical error. I&rsquo;m in desperate need of an official <em>CMOS</em> ruling, just to make sure we get this right! The section in question is as follows: &ldquo;Most people only know the one reality they&rsquo;ve lived. You&rsquo;re getting front-row seats to three more.&rdquo; Should &ldquo;front-row seats&rdquo; be hyphenated in this instance?</p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 20:00:50 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ManuscriptPreparation/faq0211.html Q. Throughout CMOS, as well as in Webster’s, I see that some guidelines or spellings apply to “formal” writing and others to “informal” writing. How do you define formal and informal writing? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Throughout <em>CMOS</em>, as well as in <em>Webster&rsquo;s</em>, I see that some guidelines or spellings apply to &ldquo;formal&rdquo; writing and others to &ldquo;informal&rdquo; writing. How do you define formal and informal writing?</p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 19:58:38 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0132.html Q. Does CMOS have an official position on hyphenating “the then” when used to indicate something or someone’s former status? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Does <em>CMOS</em> have an official position on hyphenating &ldquo;the then&rdquo; when used to indicate something or someone&rsquo;s former status?</p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 19:57:09 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0131.html Q. How would you treat “over apologize” in this sentence? “Be careful not to over apologize.” <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>How would you treat &ldquo;over apologize&rdquo; in this sentence? &ldquo;Be careful not to over apologize.&rdquo;</p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 18:45:03 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0344.html Q. When referencing government reports with no author, is the author the country or the department? I have always used the department; however, our university style guide based on CMOS says to use the country. For example, Australia, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry . . .&nbsp; <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>When referencing government reports with no author, is the author the country or the department? I have always used the department; however, our university style guide based on <em>CMOS</em> says to use the country. For example, Australia, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry . . .&nbsp;</p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 18:42:57 GMT https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Usage/faq0347.html Q. From your July Q&A: “Comprehensive tip sheets for setting up a paper are available for free at the Turabian.org website.” Really? “For free”? Free here is an adverb modifying the verbal phrase “are available,” not a noun, and cannot be the object of the preposition for. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>From your July Q&amp;A: &ldquo;Comprehensive tip sheets for setting up a paper are available for free at the Turabian.org website.&rdquo; Really? &ldquo;For free&rdquo;? <em>Free</em> here is an adverb modifying the verbal phrase &ldquo;are available,&rdquo; not a noun, and cannot be the object of the preposition <em>for</em>.</p> Tue, 07 Aug 2018 18:41:24 GMT