CMOS FAQ Questions http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/ Latest CMOS FAQ Questions with links to the answers en-us Thu, 21 Jul 2016 05:00:00 GMT 60 http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Plurals/faq0028.html Q. Our marketing people want to know which is correct: The buyer(s) purchase a policy or the buyer(s) purchases a policy. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Our marketing people want to know which is correct: The buyer(s) purchase a policy or the buyer(s) purchases a policy.</p> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 21:50:34 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Capitalization/faq0059.html Q. Is it okay to capitalize Modernist when speaking of the twentieth-century movement in English literature? Many sources favor the lowercase, but I’ve always done the opposite. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Is it okay to capitalize <em>Modernist</em> when speaking of the twentieth-century movement in English literature? Many sources favor the lowercase, but I&rsquo;ve always done the opposite.</p> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 21:49:36 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Commas/faq0071.html Q. I believe this may have been addressed back in the 14th edition, but I cannot find a current rule to support my writing “Yes sir!” as an exclamation (or “Yes ma’am!”) in the manner of “Aye sir!” Would you please let me know what CMOS’s view is on this? I have been leaving out the comma and am now being challenged by publishers I’m editing for. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I believe this may have been addressed back in the 14th edition, but I cannot find a current rule to support my writing &ldquo;Yes sir!&rdquo; as an exclamation (or &ldquo;Yes ma&rsquo;am!&rdquo;) in the manner of &ldquo;Aye sir!&rdquo; Would you please let me know what <em>CMOS</em>&rsquo;s view is on this? I have been leaving out the comma and am now being challenged by publishers I&rsquo;m editing for.</p> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 21:48:33 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Abbreviations/faq0065.html Q. I work for a theological seminary and am editing a brochure that has a list of speakers. If the speaker is an ordained minister or has a PhD, that is noted with a Rev. or Dr. However, there are a few speakers on this list who are just referred to by first and last name with no social title such as Mr. or Ms. I think this is incorrect, but I can’t find anything to support my position. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I work for a theological seminary and am editing a brochure that has a list of speakers. If the speaker is an ordained minister or has a PhD, that is noted with a <em>Rev.</em> or <em>Dr.</em> However, there are a few speakers on this list who are just referred to by first and last name with no social title such as <em>Mr.</em> or <em>Ms.</em> I think this is incorrect, but I can&rsquo;t find anything to support my position.</p> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 21:47:32 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Numbers/faq0037.html Q. Which is correct: 12,000,000 or 12 million? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Which is correct: 12,000,000 or 12 million?</p> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 21:46:30 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Punctuation/faq0106.html Q. When using an ellipsis in a quotation that contains a full sentence and then deletes some of the next sentence, do you use a period at the end of the full sentence followed by a space and the three dots? Then do you capitalize the first word of the next sentence and do you bracket the first letter to show it was not capitalized? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>When using an ellipsis in a quotation that contains a full sentence and then deletes some of the next sentence, do you use a period at the end of the full sentence followed by a space and the three dots? Then do you capitalize the first word of the next sentence and do you bracket the first letter to show it was not capitalized?</p> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 21:45:32 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Usage/faq0303.html Q. Please give me your thoughts on subject/verb agreement in the following construction: “History, and the efforts of many people, [have or has] given this island a valuable gift.” Does an and phrase set off in commas change the number of the verb? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Please give me your thoughts on subject/verb agreement in the following construction: &ldquo;History, and the efforts of many people, [have or has] given this island a valuable gift.&rdquo; Does an <em>and</em> phrase set off in commas change the number of the verb?</p> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 21:43:51 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Compounds/faq0018.html Q. Section 7.85 says that a noun + participle phrase is hyphenated before a noun that it modifies but is open otherwise (e.g., “a clothes-buying grandmother” vs. “a day of clothes buying”). However, would a verb shown as hyphenated in the dictionary retain the hyphen in its participle form? For example, Merriam-Webster hyphenates the verb “to color-code,” so would “color-coded” be hyphenated or open in the sentence “The binders were color-coded”? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Section 7.85 says that a noun + participle phrase is hyphenated before a noun that it modifies but is open otherwise (e.g., &ldquo;a clothes-buying grandmother&rdquo; vs. &ldquo;a day of clothes buying&rdquo;). However, would a verb shown as hyphenated in the dictionary retain the hyphen in its participle form? For example, <em>Merriam-Webster</em> hyphenates the verb &ldquo;to color-code,&rdquo; so would &ldquo;color-coded&rdquo; be hyphenated or open in the sentence &ldquo;The binders were color-coded&rdquo;?</p> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 21:42:41 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ProperNames/faq0042.html Q. I am a government auditor who frequently issues findings to entities with long, cumbersome names (e.g., the Tri-County Regional Planning Commission for Widget Standards and Inspections). In my previous job, I was instructed to state the full name of the entity the first time it appeared in a report, followed by a capitalized abbreviated version (e.g., Commission) throughout the rest of the report. In my new job, I have been instructed to follow The Chicago Manual of Style, which has been interpreted to mean using lowercase for such abbreviations. Apparently, I am not the first person to question this practice, and it has become a source of contention in our office. Do you have any words of wisdom to help mediate this dispute? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I am a government auditor who frequently issues findings to entities with long, cumbersome names (e.g., the Tri-County Regional Planning Commission for Widget Standards and Inspections). In my previous job, I was instructed to state the full name of the entity the first time it appeared in a report, followed by a capitalized abbreviated version (e.g., Commission) throughout the rest of the report. In my new job, I have been instructed to follow <em>The Chicago Manual of Style</em>, which has been interpreted to mean using lowercase for such abbreviations. Apparently, I am not the first person to question this practice, and it has become a source of contention in our office. Do you have any words of wisdom to help mediate this dispute?</p> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 21:39:28 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Pronouns/faq0028.html Q. A colleague and I are pondering the correct usage of reflexive pronouns (CMOS 5.48). Can they be used as objects of the preposition if they still refer back to the subject of the verb? Here’s our example: “I see benefits for both my class and myself in using that approach.” We could rewrite the sentence and may do that, but we’re more interested now in the “legality” of the usage. Would switching class and myself sound less awkward? That way, myself would be closer to its subject. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>A colleague and I are pondering the correct usage of reflexive pronouns (<em>CMOS</em> 5.48). Can they be used as objects of the preposition if they still refer back to the subject of the verb? Here&rsquo;s our example: &ldquo;I see benefits for both my class and myself in using that approach.&rdquo; We could rewrite the sentence and may do that, but we&rsquo;re more interested now in the &ldquo;legality&rdquo; of the usage. Would switching <em>class</em> and <em>myself</em> sound less awkward? That way, <em>myself</em> would be closer to its subject.</p> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 21:38:05 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Usage/faq0302.html Q. I’m trying to get clarification on the shined/shone issue, as all the sources I have found seem to differ, and it is driving me crazy. Can you confirm for me, once and for all, the use of each of these? Would the following sentence use shined or shone, for instance? Mary shone/shined the flashlight in front of them to light the way. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I&rsquo;m trying to get clarification on the <em>shined/shone</em> issue, as all the sources I have found seem to differ, and it is driving me crazy. Can you confirm for me, once and for all, the use of each of these? Would the following sentence use <em>shined</em> or <em>shone</em>, for instance? Mary shone/shined the flashlight in front of them to light the way.</p> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 21:36:05 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0113.html Q. Do you recommend using suspended compounds and hyphenation in the following cases? hard- and software; up- and downgrade. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Do you recommend using suspended compounds and hyphenation in the following cases? hard- and software; up- and downgrade.</p> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 21:31:22 GMT