CMOS FAQ Questions http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/ Latest CMOS FAQ Questions with links to the answers en-us Wed, 18 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT 60 http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Capitalization/faq0066.html Q. Is elect capitalized in president-elect (in running text, when preceding the person’s name)? That is, should one write “President-Elect Donald Trump” or “President-elect Donald Trump”? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Is <em>elect</em> capitalized in <em>president-elect</em> (in running text, when preceding the person&rsquo;s name)? That is, should one write &ldquo;President-Elect Donald Trump&rdquo; or &ldquo;President-elect Donald Trump&rdquo;?</p> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:40:38 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Numbers/faq0042.html Q. My coworkers and I are debating what exactly is meant by the word isolated in section 9.21 (“isolated references to amounts of money are spelled out for whole numbers of one hundred or less”). One opinion is that two or more references to amounts of money in one sentence no longer qualify as isolated, as in “He had $0.21 and she had $21.00.” The other opinion is that one sentence containing two or more references to amounts of money could still qualify as isolated if the surrounding text does not mention money, as in “He had twenty-one cents and she had twenty-one dollars” in a passage contrasting the two people personally with no other reference to money. Could you please settle our debate? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>My coworkers and I are debating what exactly is meant by the word <em>isolated</em> in section 9.21 (&ldquo;isolated references to amounts of money are spelled out for whole numbers of one hundred or less&rdquo;). One opinion is that two or more references to amounts of money in one sentence no longer qualify as isolated, as in &ldquo;He had $0.21 and she had $21.00.&rdquo; The other opinion is that one sentence containing two or more references to amounts of money could still qualify as isolated if the surrounding text does not mention money, as in &ldquo;He had twenty-one cents and she had twenty-one dollars&rdquo; in a passage contrasting the two people personally with no other reference to money. Could you please settle our debate?</p> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:39:17 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0307.html Q. Can a citation be too long? And how do you know if it is? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Can a citation be too long? And how do you know if it is?</p> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:37:19 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ManuscriptPreparation/faq0178.html Q. I am looking to know the proper style for when I start my paper with a block quote. This quote is not integrated into the text. It is simply there in lieu of an introductory paragraph at the very, very beginning of my paper. I have thoroughly gone through the manual and cannot find an example or advice for what to do in this instance. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I am looking to know the proper style for when I start my paper with a block quote. This quote is not integrated into the text. It is simply there in lieu of an introductory paragraph at the very, very beginning of my paper. I have thoroughly gone through the manual and cannot find an example or advice for what to do in this instance.</p> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:36:19 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/NoneoftheAbove/faq0034.html Q. Authors younger than myself have recently included the following phrase in their writing: “If you think that, you’ve got another thing coming.” I’ve tried to point out the illogic of “another thing,” but I’m met with baffled looks. An informal poll shows me that nearly everyone today believes the expression is “another thing coming.” A rock band seems to have compounded the problem by using this phrase in one of their hit songs. I’ve gotten firm resistance when suggesting that the phrase be rendered “another think coming.” At what point does a mondegreen supersede the original phrase and become the accepted norm? Is it time for me to “stet” and move on? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Authors younger than myself have recently included the following phrase in their writing: &ldquo;If you think that, you&rsquo;ve got another thing coming.&rdquo; I&rsquo;ve tried to point out the illogic of &ldquo;another thing,&rdquo; but I&rsquo;m met with baffled looks. An informal poll shows me that nearly everyone today believes the expression is &ldquo;another thing coming.&rdquo; A rock band seems to have compounded the problem by using this phrase in one of their hit songs. I&rsquo;ve gotten firm resistance when suggesting that the phrase be rendered &ldquo;another <em>think</em> coming.&rdquo; At what point does a mondegreen supersede the original phrase and become the accepted norm? Is it time for me to &ldquo;stet&rdquo; and move on?</p> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:35:15 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Capitalization/faq0065.html Q. Should professor be capitalized in this sentence? “He studied at Yale University and went on to become a professor.” <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Should <em>professor</em> be capitalized in this sentence? &ldquo;He studied at Yale University and went on to become a professor.&rdquo;</p> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:34:13 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Capitalization/faq0064.html Q. I recently started working for an institution founded on the values of the Sisters of Mercy. I am working on our magazine, and I’d truly appreciate your skilled recommendation on whether or not to capitalize the word mercy in various tricky/gray areas. For example, we know mercy should be lowercase when used in the generic sense, as in “he begged for mercy” or “at the mercy of the court,” and capitalized when used in a proper name, as in Mount Mercy University or Mercy Hospital. The trick is in situations like “a mercy education,” “a mercy institution,” or “providing mercy care.” We are looking through many guides and checking with other mercy institutions to figure out best practice, but I would love a CMOS ruling! <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I recently started working for an institution founded on the values of the Sisters of Mercy. I am working on our magazine, and I&rsquo;d truly appreciate your skilled recommendation on whether or not to capitalize the word <em>mercy</em> in various tricky/gray areas. For example, we know <em>mercy</em> should be lowercase when used in the generic sense, as in &ldquo;he begged for mercy&rdquo; or &ldquo;at the mercy of the court,&rdquo; and capitalized when used in a proper name, as in Mount Mercy University or Mercy Hospital. The trick is in situations like &ldquo;a mercy education,&rdquo; &ldquo;a mercy institution,&rdquo; or &ldquo;providing mercy care.&rdquo; We are looking through many guides and checking with other mercy institutions to figure out best practice, but I would love a <em>CMOS</em> ruling!</p> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:33:20 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Abbreviations/faq0071.html Q. Hello, I’m looking for clarification for 10.34. Are you recommending 123 MAIN ST STE 456 for envelopes but 123 Main St., Ste. 456 for running text, etc.? (And if capitalizing the envelopes, would the entire address be capitalized?) <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Hello, I&rsquo;m looking for clarification for 10.34. Are you recommending 123 MAIN ST STE 456 for envelopes but 123 Main St., Ste. 456 for running text, etc.? (And if capitalizing the envelopes, would the entire address be capitalized?)</p> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:32:22 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Semicolons/faq0002.html Q. Is the use of semicolons in the following series warranted (i.e., when the commas appear in the last member of the series and there’s no real threat of misreading)? It just looks weird to me: They were hunter-gatherers who sustained themselves by hunting; fishing; and gathering roots, berries, and various wild plants.&nbsp; <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Is the use of semicolons in the following series warranted (i.e., when the commas appear in the last member of the series and there&rsquo;s no real threat of misreading)? It just looks weird to me: They were hunter-gatherers who sustained themselves by hunting; fishing; and gathering roots, berries, and various wild plants.&nbsp;</p> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:22:10 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Pronouns/faq0029.html Q. I’m confused about the word neither. Is it plural or singular? How should the following sentence be written? Neither of them (likes/like) to travel.&nbsp; <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I&rsquo;m confused about the word <em>neither</em>. Is it plural or singular? How should the following sentence be written? Neither of them (likes/like) to travel.&nbsp;</p> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:20:27 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0306.html Q. When writing a paper, do you footnote information that you have learned in multiple sources? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>When writing a paper, do you footnote information that you have learned in multiple sources?</p> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:19:27 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Plurals/faq0031.html Q. Can CMOS weigh in on the pluralization of trademarked materials? We have an internal debate over “iPhone 7s” versus “iPhones 7.” <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Can <em>CMOS</em> weigh in on the pluralization of trademarked materials? We have an internal debate over &ldquo;iPhone 7s&rdquo; versus &ldquo;iPhones 7.&rdquo;</p> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:17:06 GMT