CMOS FAQ Questions http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/ Latest CMOS FAQ Questions with links to the answers en-us Mon, 23 Oct 2017 05:00:00 GMT 60 http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/CapitalizationTitles/faq0078.html Q. I’m editing a manuscript that mentions a replica of Michelangelo’s David. I know that per 8.198 (17th ed.), David should be italicized. However, should it be italicized in sentences like “David was naked, after all”; “he stumbled forward into David and knocked the statue over onto the pavers; “David’s head parted company with his underendowed body”? I hope to avoid numerous repetitions of the phrase “the statue of David.” <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I&rsquo;m editing a manuscript that mentions a replica of Michelangelo&rsquo;s <em>David</em>. I know that per 8.198 (17th ed.), <em>David</em> should be italicized. However, should it be italicized in sentences like &ldquo;David was naked, after all&rdquo;; &ldquo;he stumbled forward into David and knocked the statue over onto the pavers; &ldquo;David&rsquo;s head parted company with his underendowed body&rdquo;? I hope to avoid numerous repetitions of the phrase &ldquo;the statue of David.&rdquo;</p> Tue, 03 Oct 2017 20:50:57 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Punctuation/faq0119.html Q. My writer frequently writes a sentence with several points, each of which is denoted by a number inside parentheses. Sometimes these points are preceded by a comma or semicolon, and sometimes there is no punctuation to distinguish between each part other than the aforementioned (#)s. Which way is correct? Should these points be preceded by some punctuation, and if so, what kind? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>My writer frequently writes a sentence with several points, each of which is denoted by a number inside parentheses. Sometimes these points are preceded by a comma or semicolon, and sometimes there is no punctuation to distinguish between each part other than the aforementioned (#)s. Which way is correct? Should these points be preceded by some punctuation, and if so, what kind?</p> Tue, 03 Oct 2017 20:49:53 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0326.html Q. I’m writing a paper in which I periodically have to repeat quotations, or parts of quotations, that I have already used earlier in the work. I’ve looked through CMOS but I still can’t work out how this should be done. I could just repeat the citation (I’m using author-date style), but this seems cumbersome. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I&rsquo;m writing a paper in which I periodically have to repeat quotations, or parts of quotations, that I have already used earlier in the work. I&rsquo;ve looked through <em>CMOS</em> but I still can&rsquo;t work out how this should be done. I could just repeat the citation (I&rsquo;m using author-date style), but this seems cumbersome.</p> Tue, 03 Oct 2017 20:48:17 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Capitalization/faq0068.html Q. In a nongovernmental organization, are job titles ever capitalized in full or part when they include the name of a department? For example, Network Development is the name of a department; would we use lowercase when referring to a “network development specialist”? Thank you for any guidance. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>In a nongovernmental organization, are job titles ever capitalized in full or part when they include the name of a department? For example, Network Development is the name of a department; would we use lowercase when referring to a &ldquo;network development specialist&rdquo;? Thank you for any guidance.</p> Tue, 03 Oct 2017 20:46:44 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Commas/faq0080.html Q. Is it ever appropriate to elide a conjunction between two parts of a compound predicate and use a comma (for example, “He walked to the door, opened it.”)? I notice that many of the fiction authors I edit do this frequently. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Is it ever appropriate to elide a conjunction between two parts of a compound predicate and use a comma (for example, &ldquo;He walked to the door, opened it.&rdquo;)? I notice that many of the fiction authors I edit do this frequently.</p> Tue, 03 Oct 2017 20:45:38 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0124.html Q. Hi, I am working on a publication which uses imperial measurements and have been asked to provide the metric equivalent in parentheses. I am not sure how to deal with this when the measurements form a hyphenated compound adjective before a noun. Using an example from your hyphenation table, three-inch-high statuette, would the hyphen placement in the following conversion be reasonable? three-inch (eight-centimeter)-high statuette? Many thanks. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Hi, I am working on a publication which uses imperial measurements and have been asked to provide the metric equivalent in parentheses. I am not sure how to deal with this when the measurements form a hyphenated compound adjective before a noun. Using an example from your hyphenation table, three-inch-high statuette, would the hyphen placement in the following conversion be reasonable? three-inch (eight-centimeter)-high statuette? Many thanks.</p> Tue, 03 Oct 2017 20:44:43 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Plurals/faq0033.html Q. How do you pluralize an acronym where the plural form of the word written out does not use an s? For example, if I have an acronym of ALC that stands for Adorable Little Child and want to make the acronym plural (i.e., Adorable Little Children), do I use the s or leave it out? If I use the s and write the plural acronym as ALCs, I feel like I’m saying Adorable Little Childrens, which is not grammatically correct. Would ALC be used for both the singular and plural? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>How do you pluralize an acronym where the plural form of the word written out does not use an <em>s</em>? For example, if I have an acronym of ALC that stands for Adorable Little Child and want to make the acronym plural (i.e., Adorable Little Children), do I use the <em>s</em> or leave it out? If I use the <em>s</em> and write the plural acronym as ALCs, I feel like I&rsquo;m saying Adorable Little Childrens, which is not grammatically correct. Would ALC be used for both the singular and plural?</p> Tue, 03 Oct 2017 20:42:15 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ProperNames/faq0046.html Q. The author has italicized the names of fashionable gowns (e.g., “the Primavera gown, inspired by Botticelli”), perhaps as a work of art. My inclination is to remove the italics. Do you have a guideline on this? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>The author has italicized the names of fashionable gowns (e.g., &ldquo;the <em>Primavera</em> gown, inspired by Botticelli&rdquo;), perhaps as a work of art. My inclination is to remove the italics. Do you have a guideline on this?</p> Tue, 03 Oct 2017 20:19:43 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/YouCouldLookItUp/faq0025.html Q. Is impactful a word and can it be used in place of influential? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Is <em>impactful</em> a word and can it be used in place of <em>influential</em>?</p> Tue, 03 Oct 2017 20:18:24 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ManuscriptPreparation/faq0191.html Q. I see that CMOS considers a line consisting of a single word or part of a word to be an “orphan.” I understand that a line that consists of only part of one word would look strange and be undesirable, but is it really necessary to avoid one-word lines in all cases? If the word is short (one or two letters), it does look strange, but I think longer words look fine and are sometimes helpful in “stretching” text that needs to fill a full page. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I see that <em>CMOS</em> considers a line consisting of a single word or part of a word to be an &ldquo;orphan.&rdquo; I understand that a line that consists of only part of one word would look strange and be undesirable, but is it really necessary to avoid one-word lines in all cases? If the word is short (one or two letters), it does look strange, but I think longer words look fine and are sometimes helpful in &ldquo;stretching&rdquo; text that needs to fill a full page.</p> Tue, 03 Oct 2017 20:16:55 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Punctuation/faq0118.html Q. I can’t find anywhere in CMOS 17 the correct procedure for punctuation at the end of rhetorical questions. A question mark seems out of place and an exclamation point, which CMOS does mention, seems gratuitous. Here are two such rhetorical questions from my forthcoming book: The question for any owner or manager was, however, how much revenue are those live commercials bringing into the station. The bigger question would be, could Crist and Johnson hold on to the station. Will a period suffice for those? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I can&rsquo;t find anywhere in <em>CMOS </em>17 the correct procedure for punctuation at the end of rhetorical questions. A question mark seems out of place and an exclamation point, which <em>CMOS</em> does mention, seems gratuitous. Here are two such rhetorical questions from my forthcoming book:</p> <p class="indent_Q_pt5in">The question for any owner or manager was, however, how much revenue are those live commercials bringing into the station.<br /> <br /> The bigger question would be, could Crist and Johnson hold on to the station.</p> <p class="Q">Will a period suffice for those?</p> Tue, 03 Oct 2017 20:15:37 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Compounds/faq0023.html Q. I recently read an article about a con artist who was described as “running a fine wine scam.” The ambiguity—is it a fine scam with wine or a scam with fine wine?—is driving me to drink. Is it acceptable in this situation to write finewine as one word to resolve the ambiguity? Please uncork me a good answer. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I recently read an article about a con artist who was described as &ldquo;running a fine wine scam.&rdquo; The ambiguity&mdash;is it a fine scam with wine or a scam with fine wine?&mdash;is driving <em>me</em> to drink. Is it acceptable in this situation to write <em>finewine</em> as one word to resolve the ambiguity? Please uncork me a good answer.</p> Tue, 03 Oct 2017 20:10:58 GMT