CMOS FAQ Questions http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/ Latest CMOS FAQ Questions with links to the answers en-us Tue, 23 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT 60 http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Abbreviations/faq0075.html Q. I read in one of the questions on the website that it is acceptable to begin a sentence with an acronym. If the acronym is not a common one, NASA for example, wouldn’t it be appropriate to instead begin the sentence with the word The and then the acronym? I am having a difficult time with beginning a sentence with acronyms. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I read in one of the questions on the website that it is acceptable to begin a sentence with an acronym. If the acronym is not a common one, NASA for example, wouldn&rsquo;t it be appropriate to instead begin the sentence with the word <em>The</em> and then the acronym? I am having a difficult time with beginning a sentence with acronyms.</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 22:33:31 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0127.html Q. Forgive me for what might be an obvious and maybe annoying question, but what do you recommend when your advice seems to differ from M-W Collegiate when it comes to hyphenation of prefixes? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Forgive me for what might be an obvious and maybe annoying question, but what do you recommend when your advice seems to differ from <em>M-W Collegiate</em> when it comes to hyphenation of prefixes?</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 22:32:08 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Commas/faq0081.html Q. When you start a sentence with so should it be followed by a comma? Example: So, let’s write one. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>When you start a sentence with <em>so</em> should it be followed by a comma? Example: So, let&rsquo;s write one.</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 22:29:31 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Usage/faq0335.html Q. This may sound existential, but is the appropriate word be or is in the following sentence: In the end, it is actual life, whether it be easy or difficult. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>This may sound existential, but is the appropriate word <em>be</em> or <em>is</em> in the following sentence: In the end, it is actual life, whether it be easy or difficult.</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 22:28:19 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Usage/faq0334.html Q. Please let me know your thoughts on using compete as follows: “The grants are competed annually.” I’m inclined to rewrite the sentence. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Please let me know your thoughts on using <em>compete</em> as follows: &ldquo;The grants are competed annually.&rdquo; I&rsquo;m inclined to rewrite the sentence.</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 22:26:50 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0330.html Q. Do YouTube video blogs that are made by everyday people (i.e., not mainstream corporate companies) need to be cited in the bibliography? Or do they just need a note? If so, what is the style format? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Do YouTube video blogs that are made by everyday people (i.e., not mainstream corporate companies) need to be cited in the bibliography? Or do they just need a note? If so, what is the style format?</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 22:25:29 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Usage/faq0333.html Q. Is it appropriate to delete man or woman from chair when presenting someone’s official job title? For example, would you recommend saying “Joe Schmo, chair of company A” even if that person’s title is listed as chairman on the company’s website? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Is it appropriate to delete <em>man</em> or <em>woman</em> from <em>chair</em> when presenting someone&rsquo;s official job title? For example, would you recommend saying &ldquo;Joe Schmo, chair of company A&rdquo; even if that person&rsquo;s title is listed as <em>chairman</em> on the company&rsquo;s website?</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 22:23:52 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ManuscriptPreparation/faq0198.html Q. I’m editing a book manuscript that requires emphasis on the first letter of specific words throughout. It’s about a self-assessment system based on two acronyms. Assume one of them is ACRONYM, and the words are Ack Crud Retch Omigod No Yikes Mortified. The author treats the words two different ways, neither of which is particularly readable: Capped, in quotation marks: Take your allotment of “A”ck, align it with your “C”rud, evaluate your “R”etch. Capped, with the remainder of the word in parentheses: Is your O(migod) serving your N(o) in this enterprise? Will you have enough Y(ikes) to keep you M(ortified)? Clearly, neither of these is acceptable. How can I make this manuscript readable? I know she will insist on keeping the initial caps, even in the middle of sentences, because the acronym is trademarked. But after I strip out the quotation marks and/or parentheses from these words, how do I make it clear the initial caps aren’t typos? Boldface? Italics? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I&rsquo;m editing a book manuscript that requires emphasis on the first letter of specific words throughout. It&rsquo;s about a self-assessment system based on two acronyms. Assume one of them is ACRONYM, and the words are Ack Crud Retch Omigod No Yikes Mortified. The author treats the words two different ways, neither of which is particularly readable:</p> <ol> <li>Capped, in quotation marks: Take your allotment of &ldquo;A&rdquo;ck, align it with your &ldquo;C&rdquo;rud, evaluate your &ldquo;R&rdquo;etch.</li> <li>Capped, with the remainder of the word in parentheses: Is your O(migod) serving your N(o) in this enterprise? Will you have enough Y(ikes) to keep you M(ortified)?</li> </ol> <p class="Q">Clearly, neither of these is acceptable. How can I make this manuscript readable? I know she will insist on keeping the initial caps, even in the middle of sentences, because the acronym is trademarked. But after I strip out the quotation marks and/or parentheses from these words, how do I make it clear the initial caps aren&rsquo;t typos? Boldface? Italics?</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 22:18:57 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ManuscriptPreparation/faq0197.html Q. Consistent with CMOS 2.10, our office does not use full justification for typed materials. Some of my colleagues go a step further to avoid hyphenation across lines, which they believe is distracting to the reader, and use only nonbreaking hyphens. I can’t find any support for this in CMOS (or elsewhere). It seems to me that it could cause the “exceedingly uneven lines” that CMOS 7.47 speaks of (for example, in the event of a several-words-long phrasal adjective). So please settle our debate: should we ordinarily use nonbreaking hyphens, or is it just fine for hyphenated terms to break across ragged-margin lines? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Consistent with <em>CMOS</em> 2.10, our office does not use full justification for typed materials. Some of my colleagues go a step further to avoid hyphenation across lines, which they believe is distracting to the reader, and use only nonbreaking hyphens. I can&rsquo;t find any support for this in <em>CMOS</em> (or elsewhere). It seems to me that it could cause the &ldquo;exceedingly uneven lines&rdquo; that <em>CMOS</em> 7.47 speaks of (for example, in the event of a several-words-long phrasal adjective). So please settle our debate: should we ordinarily use nonbreaking hyphens, or is it just fine for hyphenated terms to break across ragged-margin lines?</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 21:03:46 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0329.html Q. Has Chicago completely eliminated the use of ibid., when quoting more than once from the same source? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Has Chicago completely eliminated the use of <em>ibid</em>., when quoting more than once from the same source?</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 20:50:33 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ManuscriptPreparation/faq0196.html Q. I have read that if you’re using illustrations or figures you should put them in the text as close to where they are mentioned as possible. Also I was wondering how to cite the images. I just want to clarify this for my art history term paper. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I have read that if you&rsquo;re using illustrations or figures you should put them in the text as close to where they are mentioned as possible. Also I was wondering how to cite the images. I just want to clarify this for my art history term paper.</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 20:40:39 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ManuscriptPreparation/faq0195.html Q. I’m editing a novel in which a character stutters on the first word of a sentence. Are both instances capitalized (e.g., “M-My name is” or “M-my name is”)? And do I use a hyphen or an em dash? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I&rsquo;m editing a novel in which a character stutters on the first word of a sentence. Are both instances capitalized (e.g., &ldquo;M-My name is&rdquo; or &ldquo;M-my name is&rdquo;)? And do I use a hyphen or an em dash?</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 20:38:55 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ManuscriptPreparation/faq0194.html Q. What is the name of the typeface that is used on your website? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>What is the name of the typeface that is used on your website?</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 20:37:36 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/YouCouldLookItUp/faq0027.html Q. In the early 1930s, my grandmother won a citywide crossword puzzle contest in New York City, earning the $1,000 prize at a time when money was tight. The winning word was qobar, a word that no longer appears in even unabridged dictionaries. Once a word is a word, isn’t it always a word? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>In the early 1930s, my grandmother won a citywide crossword puzzle contest in New York City, earning the $1,000 prize at a time when money was tight. The winning word was <em>qobar</em>, a word that no longer appears in even unabridged dictionaries. Once a word is a word, isn&rsquo;t it always a word?</p> Tue, 02 Jan 2018 20:35:06 GMT