CMOS FAQ Questions http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/ Latest CMOS FAQ Questions with links to the answers en-us Fri, 26 May 2017 05:00:00 GMT 60 http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0315.html Q. In a dissertation that includes a lengthy biographical chapter sourced almost entirely by personal interviews, complex ecclesiastical archives (including diocesan newsletters, Vatican documents), and various personal letters, I, as editor, have used in-text referencing throughout except for that one chapter, for which I have used footnotes. Within that chapter, published books are also documented in-text. Is that combination of two methods of referencing acceptable? Or should I simply have used footnotes throughout because the interviews and archival information couldn’t be documented in-text? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>In a dissertation that includes a lengthy biographical chapter sourced almost entirely by personal interviews, complex ecclesiastical archives (including diocesan newsletters, Vatican documents), and various personal letters, I, as editor, have used in-text referencing throughout except for that one chapter, for which I have used footnotes. Within that chapter, published books are also documented in-text. Is that combination of two methods of referencing acceptable? Or should I simply have used footnotes throughout because the interviews and archival information couldn&rsquo;t be documented in-text?</p> Tue, 02 May 2017 20:08:23 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0119.html Q. How would you punctuate an invented noun? I am editing a theoretical work that uses adjective + -ness to come up with new forms of abstract concepts along the lines of Americanness and pinkness. For both of those words, I would close the suffix and omit the hyphen; my author has them separated with a hyphen (pink-ness). Which is correct style? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>How would you punctuate an invented noun? I am editing a theoretical work that uses adjective + <em>-ness</em> to come up with new forms of abstract concepts along the lines of <em>Americanness</em> and <em>pinkness</em>. For both of those words, I would close the suffix and omit the hyphen; my author has them separated with a hyphen (<em>pink-ness</em>). Which is correct style?</p> Tue, 02 May 2017 20:07:02 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Usage/faq0320.html Q. What is the rule for subject-verb agreement when a sentence has a collective noun + prepositional phrase + relative pronoun? For example, should it be “Scientists follow a set of guidelines that include x” (because the antecedent of that is guidelines), or “Scientists follow a set of guidelines that includes x” (because the subject is set)? Or does the answer differ depending on whether the writer wants to emphasize set or guidelines as the subject? And would the answer change if the sentence had “the set” instead of “a set” (as in the rule about mass noun + prepositional phrase)? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>What is the rule for subject-verb agreement when a sentence has a collective noun + prepositional phrase + relative pronoun? For example, should it be &ldquo;Scientists follow a set of guidelines that include <em>x</em>&rdquo; (because the antecedent of <em>that</em> is <em>guidelines</em>), or &ldquo;Scientists follow a set of guidelines that includes <em>x</em>&rdquo; (because the subject is <em>set</em>)? Or does the answer differ depending on whether the writer wants to emphasize <em>set</em> or <em>guidelines</em> as the subject? And would the answer change if the sentence had &ldquo;<em>the</em> set&rdquo; instead of &ldquo;<em>a </em>set&rdquo; (as in the rule about mass noun + prepositional phrase)?</p> Tue, 02 May 2017 19:54:44 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Usage/faq0319.html Q. I am an editor having a debate with some authors over their use of this article title: “Intangible Values of Palliative Nursing Care.” I have told them that it doesn’t make sense because there is no such thing as a value that is tangible, despite the existence of accounting terms such as “tangible value.” I prefer a title such as “Intangible Elements of Palliative Nursing Care.” What is your take on this? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I am an editor having a debate with some authors over their use of this article title: &ldquo;Intangible Values of Palliative Nursing Care.&rdquo; I have told them that it doesn&rsquo;t make sense because there is no such thing as a value that is tangible, despite the existence of accounting terms such as &ldquo;tangible value.&rdquo; I prefer a title such as &ldquo;Intangible Elements of Palliative Nursing Care.&rdquo; What is your take on this?</p> Tue, 02 May 2017 19:53:33 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Commas/faq0076.html Q.&nbsp;I’m editing a&nbsp;contract with many lists in it. After the recent court case involving the serial comma, I am trying to be even more diligent. I am sure at one point I read that if you have a list with items separated by the word&nbsp;or, you do not need a comma. I have looked through the entire comma, list, and conjunction sections of&nbsp;CMOS, but do not see any guidance. Which is correct? Here’s an example: I will eat pasta or pizza or salad. I will eat pasta, or pizza, or salad. Thank you in advance! <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.&nbsp;</span>I&rsquo;m editing a&nbsp;contract with many lists in it. After the recent court case involving the serial comma, I am trying to be even more diligent. I am sure at one point I read that if you have a list with items separated by the word&nbsp;<em>or</em>, you do not need a comma. I have looked through the entire comma, list, and conjunction sections of&nbsp;<em>CMOS</em>, but do not see any guidance. Which is correct? Here&rsquo;s an example: I will eat pasta or pizza or salad. I will eat pasta, or pizza, or salad. Thank you in advance!</p> Tue, 02 May 2017 19:49:08 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Compounds/faq0020.html Q. I see three different treatments for upper right in the Q&A responses: upper right, upper-right, upper right-hand. Are there any guidelines for this term? Is it hyphenated as an adjective and not as a noun? (“In the upper-right corner” vs. “In the upper right”?) <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I see three different treatments for <em>upper right</em> in the Q&amp;A responses: <em>upper right</em>, <em>upper-right</em>, <em>upper right-hand</em>. Are there any guidelines for this term? Is it hyphenated as an adjective and not as a noun? (&ldquo;In the upper-right corner&rdquo; vs. &ldquo;In the upper right&rdquo;?)</p> Tue, 02 May 2017 19:47:43 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0118.html Q. Is it OK to hyphenate a word at the end of a line that is already a hyphenated word? It looks really awkward to me, and I always call attention to this double hyphenation when I am editing/copyediting. Am I being too prissy? I can’t find anything about this in Chicago. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Is it OK to hyphenate a word at the end of a line that is already a hyphenated word? It looks really awkward to me, and I always call attention to this double hyphenation when I am editing/copyediting. Am I being too prissy? I can&rsquo;t find anything about this in Chicago.</p> Tue, 02 May 2017 19:46:11 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/SecondThoughts/faq0002.html Q. In your April Q&A, you answered a question about “woman pilot” vs. “female pilot.” I’m surprised that you didn’t address the unspoken aspect of the question: why mention gender at all? I’m guessing no one says “man pilot” or “male pilot,” just as people don’t say “white doctor,” but they do say “black doctor” as if gender and color are only worth noting if the people don’t belong to the dominant demographics. Does Chicago have any thoughts about that? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>In your April Q&amp;A, you answered a question about &ldquo;woman pilot&rdquo; vs. &ldquo;female pilot.&rdquo; I&rsquo;m surprised that you didn&rsquo;t address the unspoken aspect of the question: why mention gender at all? I&rsquo;m guessing no one says &ldquo;man pilot&rdquo; or &ldquo;male pilot,&rdquo; just as people don&rsquo;t say &ldquo;white doctor,&rdquo; but they do say &ldquo;black doctor&rdquo; as if gender and color are only worth noting if the people don&rsquo;t belong to the dominant demographics. Does Chicago have any thoughts about that?</p> Tue, 02 May 2017 19:43:39 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Quotations/faq0059.html Q. How does one handle a parenthetical phrase within dialogue? For example, is this correct? “Hi, Tiger (his father’s nickname for him). What are you doing?” <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>How does one handle a parenthetical phrase within dialogue? For example, is this correct? &ldquo;Hi, Tiger (his father&rsquo;s nickname for him). What are you doing?&rdquo;</p> Tue, 02 May 2017 19:36:32 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Plurals/faq0032.html Q.&nbsp;In references to more than one century, is it correct to use&nbsp;century&nbsp;when expressing a range and&nbsp;centuries&nbsp;when expressing a block of time? Is it “from the late eighteenth to early twentieth century” but “during the late eighteenth and early twentieth centuries”? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q.&nbsp;</span>In references to more than one century, is it correct to use&nbsp;<em>century</em>&nbsp;when expressing a range and&nbsp;<em>centuries</em>&nbsp;when expressing a block of time? Is it &ldquo;from the late eighteenth to early twentieth century&rdquo; but &ldquo;during the late eighteenth and early twentieth centuries&rdquo;?</p> Tue, 02 May 2017 19:34:45 GMT http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0117.html Q. Do I not have the hyphenation correct in phrases like “3-D printing” and “2-D projection”? I figure that they feature an abbreviation of the word dimensional being used as an attributive compound adjective, so they do call for hyphenation. I ask because one often encounters the abbreviations styled as 3D and 2D. Am I being overly fussy? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Do I not have the hyphenation correct in phrases like &ldquo;3-D printing&rdquo; and &ldquo;2-D projection&rdquo;? I figure that they feature an abbreviation of the word <em>dimensional</em> being used as an attributive compound adjective, so they do call for hyphenation. I ask because one often encounters the abbreviations styled as <em>3D</em> and <em>2D</em>. Am I being overly fussy?</p> Tue, 02 May 2017 19:32:17 GMT