CMOS FAQ Questions http://chicagomanualofstyle.org/ Latest CMOS FAQ Questions with links to the answers en-us Wed, 13 Dec 2017 06:00:00 GMT 60 http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ManuscriptPreparation/faq0193.html Q. In 8.174 (17th ed.), you state that the title of a work should not be used in a sentence as though it’s interchangeable with the subject matter. I agree wholeheartedly, but I’m getting repeated resistance from a writer I work with. I’d love to have a succinct rationale to give her to reinforce my position (ideally one that doesn’t sound unprofessional and snarky). It comes up in situations where the writer needs a headline or email subject line and uses “Your Tips for Getting Ahead are here!” or the like. And then it becomes clear in the body text that follows that a document titled “Tips for Getting Ahead” is being offered. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>In <a href="http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/book/ed17/part2/ch08/psec174" target="_blank">8.174</a> (17th ed.), you state that the title of a work should not be used in a sentence as though it&rsquo;s interchangeable with the subject matter. I agree wholeheartedly, but I&rsquo;m getting repeated resistance from a writer I work with. I&rsquo;d love to have a succinct rationale to give her to reinforce my position (ideally one that doesn&rsquo;t sound unprofessional and snarky). It comes up in situations where the writer needs a headline or email subject line and uses &ldquo;Your Tips for Getting Ahead are here!&rdquo; or the like. And then it becomes clear in the body text that follows that a document titled &ldquo;Tips for Getting Ahead&rdquo; is being offered.</p> Tue, 05 Dec 2017 22:06:50 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Usage/faq0332.html Q. How do you feel about lastly, as in, “Lastly, a study of cancer patients .&nbsp;.&nbsp;.”? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>How do you feel about <em>lastly</em>, as in, &ldquo;Lastly, a study of cancer patients .&nbsp;.&nbsp;.&rdquo;?</p> Tue, 05 Dec 2017 22:04:56 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/CapitalizationTitles/faq0079.html Q. It’s up to You. I came across this title. The question is whether to capitalize up. My gut says do it, because it’s an idiom of sorts, and because the typical grammar rules about prepositions and title caps don’t quite seem to address this case. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span><em>It&rsquo;s up to You.</em> I came across this title. The question is whether to capitalize <em>up</em>. My gut says do it, because it&rsquo;s an idiom of sorts, and because the typical grammar rules about prepositions and title caps don&rsquo;t quite seem to address this case.</p> Tue, 05 Dec 2017 22:03:41 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Numbers/faq0048.html Q. In the money examples in the hyphenation guide, I would not have allowed the last example, “a $50–$60 million loss.” Almost certainly “a $50 million to $60 million loss” was meant, but the construction reads “fifty dollars to sixty million dollars.” <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>In the money examples in the hyphenation guide, I would not have allowed the last example, &ldquo;a $50&ndash;$60 million loss.&rdquo; Almost certainly &ldquo;a $50 million to $60 million loss&rdquo; was meant, but the construction reads &ldquo;fifty dollars to sixty million dollars.&rdquo;</p> Tue, 05 Dec 2017 22:02:21 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ManuscriptPreparation/faq0192.html Q. I would like to know whether hyphenated words should always fall on the same line of a sentence. Is it OK to have the prefix at the end of one line and the rest of the word on the next line? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I would like to know whether hyphenated words should always fall on the same line of a sentence. Is it OK to have the prefix at the end of one line and the rest of the word on the next line?</p> Tue, 05 Dec 2017 22:01:20 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/YouCouldLookItUp/faq0026.html Q. I’ve always followed this advice in Chicago: “If, as occasionally happens, the Collegiate disagrees with the Third International, the Collegiate (or its online counterpart) should be followed, since it represents newer lexical research.” We subscribe to the online Unabridged (which also includes the Collegiate), and lately this advice no longer seems to apply consistently. Merriam-Webster seems to be updating entries in the Unabridged and leaving the Collegiate with the older version. For example, the Unabridged has life-span while the Collegiate has life span. Typically, the hyphenated version would be the more up to date. <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I&rsquo;ve always followed this advice in Chicago: &ldquo;If, as occasionally happens, the <em>Collegiate</em> disagrees with the <em>Third International</em>, the <em>Collegiate</em> (or its online counterpart) should be followed, since it represents newer lexical research.&rdquo; We subscribe to the online <em>Unabridged</em> (which also includes the <em>Collegiate</em>), and lately this advice no longer seems to apply consistently. Merriam-Webster seems to be updating entries in the <em>Unabridged</em> and leaving the <em>Collegiate</em> with the older version. For example, the <em>Unabridged</em> has <em>life-span</em> while the <em>Collegiate</em> has <em>life span</em>. Typically, the hyphenated version would be the more up to date.</p> Tue, 05 Dec 2017 21:59:47 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ProperNames/faq0048.html Q. While CMOS states that a ship’s name should be set in italics, what if it is used as a part of the name of a larger body, such as the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group? Would the ship’s name be italicized in that instance? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>While <em>CMOS</em> states that a ship&rsquo;s name should be set in italics, what if it is used as a part of the name of a larger body, such as the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group? Would the ship&rsquo;s name be italicized in that instance?</p> Tue, 05 Dec 2017 21:58:46 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/ProperNames/faq0047.html Q. When pluralizing surnames, are there instances when using an apostrophe could be considered appropriate? For example, “We’re going to dinner with the Laos” is potentially confusing. This sentence could easily be reworded (We’re going to dinner with the Lao family), but I’m wondering if Lao’s could be allowed in this context; that is, when pluralizing short, traditionally Asian surnames that could be misread when an s is added (e.g., the Gus, the Hans). <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>When pluralizing surnames, are there instances when using an apostrophe could be considered appropriate? For example, &ldquo;We&rsquo;re going to dinner with the Laos&rdquo; is potentially confusing. This sentence could easily be reworded (We&rsquo;re going to dinner with the Lao family), but I&rsquo;m wondering if <em>Lao&rsquo;s</em> could be allowed in this context; that is, when pluralizing short, traditionally Asian surnames that could be misread when an <em>s</em> is added (e.g., the Gus, the Hans).</p> Tue, 05 Dec 2017 21:57:07 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Documentation/faq0328.html Q. In a footnote do the year and page number go at the beginning or at the end? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>In a footnote do the year and page number go at the beginning or at the end?</p> Tue, 05 Dec 2017 21:55:57 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/Punctuation/faq0121.html Q. I’m editing a transcript, and our department’s lead editor is giving me some trouble. We’re suffering over the word so. Under what circumstances can one put a comma after so? For example, in this transcript, a woman says: “So great answer.” Is so functioning conjunctively here, or can it be treated as an interjection? And what, if anything, does that mean for comma placement? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>I&rsquo;m editing a transcript, and our department&rsquo;s lead editor is giving me some trouble. We&rsquo;re suffering over the word <em>so</em>. Under what circumstances can one put a comma after <em>so</em>? For example, in this transcript, a woman says: &ldquo;So great answer.&rdquo; Is <em>so</em> functioning conjunctively here, or can it be treated as an interjection? And what, if anything, does that mean for comma placement?</p> Tue, 05 Dec 2017 21:54:46 GMT http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0126.html Q. Our office compiles, edits, and publishes the laws and statutes for the state legislature. Some people in the office are averse to hyphenating phrasal adjectives, particularly ones that consist of open compounds, because they feel “these are terms recognized by everyone and are unnecessary to hyphenate. There is no confusion when reading ‘wild rice industry,’ ‘general fund appropriation,’ ‘high school student.’ These terms are instantly recognizable.” A bit presumptuous, no? A good editor helps the reader, especially when it comes to law and litigation. How does one decide whether a term is known to everyone in the world? <p class="Q"><span class="Q_label">Q. </span>Our office compiles, edits, and publishes the laws and statutes for the state legislature. Some people in the office are averse to hyphenating phrasal adjectives, particularly ones that consist of open compounds, because they feel &ldquo;these are terms recognized by everyone and are unnecessary to hyphenate. There is no confusion when reading &lsquo;wild rice industry,&rsquo; &lsquo;general fund appropriation,&rsquo; &lsquo;high school student.&rsquo; These terms are instantly recognizable.&rdquo; A bit presumptuous, no? A good editor helps the reader, especially when it comes to law and litigation. How does one decide whether a term is known to everyone in the world?</p> Tue, 05 Dec 2017 21:53:26 GMT